Frank Warren's Column: The Sun
There will be a fistic marathon tonight, on both sides of the pond, in Las Vegas, probably the most meaningful international fight of the year thus far takes place at the MGM Grand when Tim Bradley and Manny Pacquiao resume hostilities for the former's WBO World Welterweight title.

Both are in the upper echelons of the sport's mythical 'pound-for-pound' rankings. They met previously at the same venue in June 2012 with Bradley eloping with a split decision which mystified everybody. 'Pacman' appeared to have won at a canter.
I'm very tempted to invest in the 9-2 odds that bookmakers are offering on Enzo Maccarinelli becoming Wales' only ever two weight world champion.

Tonight the 33 year old former WBO cruiserweight king from Swansea meets veteran German Juergen Braehmer for the WBA light-heavyweight title at Rostock on Germany's Baltic coast. BoxNation televise live.
Given all the hard men who've grafted in the local docks and pits, it's always been a mystery to me why the sports mad north-east of England has struggled to produce more world class prizefighters.

Prior to last December, only Annfield Plain cruiserweight Glenn McCrory had made it to the sport's summit, capturing the IBF crown back in 1989.
There's an oft trotted out adage which claims that 'As goes the heavyweight division, so goes the sport of boxing.'

Well, after close to a decade of the sometimes boring Klitschko dominance – in which sports fans struggled to distinguish between Ukrainian brothers Vitali and Wladimir and the sport lacked a dominant champion because they refused to square off against each other – hopefully the sport's blue riband class is set to re-ignite in 2014.
Last Saturday night at Aintree Racecourse I believe we saw the emergence of the next big star of British boxing.

Those who saw Paul Butler's majestic bantamweight debut on BoxNation will now hopefully realise why I've been hammering on about him for so long.
Historically, boxing has a record for racial tolerance and integration that is the envy of all sports in Britain.

For decades, possibly centuries, boxing gyms on these isles have been inhabited by fighters of multiple colours and creeds, training and competing together harmoniously. Fighters earn respect from their fellow men through combat in the purest, most noble manner.
Former world heavyweight champion Vitali Klitschko bagged plenty of column inches in the news sections this week following his declaration to stand as a presidential candidate in the forthcoming democratic elections in Ukraine this May.

It triggered memories of my first dealings with 'Dr Iron fist' when he landed in the UK in June 1999 as mandatory challenger to reigning WBO champion Herbie Hide.
It is not uncommon for a son to aspire to follow in his father's footsteps. Indeed, my own sons Francis and George have trailed me into promoting fights.

But it's uncanny that three of the former world champions who I have promoted presently have sons fighting on my roster.
British rivals Dereck Chisora and Tyson Fury might just be the two best heavyweights on this planet right now whose name isn't Klitschko.

And fans will be able to assess the pair's respective world title credentials this evening when they go head-to-head against US opposition at The Copper Box Arena in east London.
The volume of modern day fighters whose careers are temporarily - or sometimes permanently - derailed due to damaged hands is both a mystery and a worry.

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